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Gemini GT-1504 15" Trapezoid Speaker Gemini GT-1504 15" Trapezoid Speaker
Regular Price: $239.90
Your Price: $119.95
ADJ ELS15A 15" 2-way Active Speaker American Audio ELS15A 15" 2-way Active Speaker
Regular Price: $339.98
Your Price: $169.99
Gemini ES-15P 15" ABS Powered Loudspeaker Gemini ES-15P 15" ABS Powered Loudspeaker
Regular Price: $399.90
Your Price: $199.95
Pyle Pro 1000 Watt 12" Powered PA Speaker Pyle Pro 1000 Watt 12" Powered PA Speaker
Regular Price: $439.98
Your Price: $219.99
Gem Sound PXA112T-USB Powered Speaker USB/SD Gem Sound PXA112T-USB Powered Speaker USB/SD
Regular Price: $459.98
Your Price: $229.99
EV ZLX-12P 12-inch Two-Way Powered Loudspeaker EV ZLX-12P 12-inch Two-Way Powered Loudspeaker
Regular Price: $799.98
Your Price: $399.99
JBL Control 28 - Pair JBL Control 28 - Pair
Regular Price: $959.98
Your Price: $479.99
EV ZLX-15P 12-inch Two-Way Powered Loudspeaker EV ZLX-15P 15-inch Two-Way Powered Loudspeaker
Regular Price: $999.98
Your Price: $499.99
Electro-Voice ELX112P 12" Live X Two-Way Powered Loudspeaker Electro-Voice ELX112P 12" Live X Two-Way Powered Loudspeaker
Regular Price: $979.00
Your Price: $599.00
Electro-Voice ELX115P 15" Live X Two-Way Powered Loudspeaker Electro-Voice ELX115P 15" Live X Two-Way Powered Loudspeaker
Regular Price: $1,139.00
Your Price: $699.00
Electro-Voice ELX118P Powered 18" Subwoofer Electro-Voice Live-X ELX118P Powered 18" Subwoofer
Regular Price: $1,199.00
Your Price: $799.99
   
 

DJ Speakers

This page of our website is devoted to the DJ who needs powered or non-powered speakers as part of his/her DJ gear. These P.A. speakers are quality Gem Sound speakers, known for their clarity and responsive punch. Your speakers are among your most important disc jockey supplies -- even the best nightclub sound systems won't perform to their potential without good speakers! We realize that you probably came here for low prices on DJ gear, but we go one step further: we offer professional quality disc jockey equipment that's priced like discount DJ equipment. With DJ equipment low prices can sometimes mean cheap DJ gear -- not here. We want your repeat business and referrals! That's why, whether you need DJ speakers, a quality portable sound system or other DJ audio equipment, you'll always find the best quality and value right here. Thanks for visiting us today. We look forward to serving you.
In any sound system, ultimate quality depends on the speakers. The best recording, encoded on the most advanced storage device and played by a top-of-the-line deck and amplifier, will sound awful if the system is hooked up to poor speakers. A system's speaker is the component that takes the electronic signal stored on things like CDs, tapes and DVDs and turns it back into actual sound that we can hear. In this article, we'll find out exactly how speakers do this. We'll also look at how speaker designs differ, and see how these differences affect sound quality. Speakers are amazing pieces of technology that have had a profound impact on our culture. But at their heart, they are remarkably simple devices. Sound Basics To understand how speakers work, you first need to understand how sound works. Inside your ear is a very thin piece of skin called the eardrum. When your eardrum vibrates, your brain interprets the vibrations as sound -- that's how you hear. Rapid changes in air pressure are the most common thing to vibrate your eardrum. An object produces sound when it vibrates in air (sound can also travel through liquids and solids, but air is the transmission medium when we listen to speakers). When something vibrates, it moves the air particles around it. Those air particles in turn move the air particles around them, carrying the pulse of the vibration through the air as a traveling disturbance. To see how this works, let's look at a simple vibrating object -- a bell. When you ring a bell, the metal vibrates -- flexes in and out -- rapidly. When it flexes out on one side, it pushes out on the surrounding air particles on that side. These air particles then collide with the particles in front of them, which collide with the particles in front of them and so on. When the bell flexes away, it pulls in on these surrounding air particles, creating a drop in pressure that pulls in on more surrounding air particles, which creates another drop in pressure that pulls in particles that are even farther out and so on. This decreasing of pressure is called rarefaction. Differentiating Sound We hear different sounds from different vibrating objects because of variations in: Sound-wave frequency - A higher wave frequency simply means that the air pressure fluctuates faster. We hear this as a higher pitch. When there are fewer fluctuations in a period of time, the pitch is lower. Air-pressure level - This is the wave's amplitude, which determines how loud the sound is. Sound waves with greater amplitudes move our ear drums more, and we register this sensation as a higher volume. A microphone works something like our ears. It has a diaphragm that is vibrated by sound waves in an area. The signal from a microphone gets encoded on a tape or CD as an electrical signal. When you play this signal back on your stereo, the amplifier sends it to the speaker, which re-interprets it into physical vibrations. Good speakers are optimized to produce extremely accurate fluctuations in air pressure, just like the ones originally picked up by the microphone. In the next section, we'll see how the speaker accomplishes this.
Making Sound In the last section, we saw that sound travels in waves of air pressure fluctuation, and that we hear sounds differently depending on the frequency and amplitude of these waves. We also learned that microphones translate sound waves into electrical signals, which can be encoded onto CDs, tapes, LPs, etc. Players convert this stored information back into an electric current for use in the stereo system. A speaker is essentially the final translation machine -- the reverse of the microphone. It takes the electrical signal and translates it back into physical vibrations to create sound waves. When everything is working as it should, the speaker produces nearly the same vibrations that the microphone originally recorded and encoded on a tape, CD, LP, etc.
Sealed Speaker Enclosures In most loudspeaker systems, the drivers and the crossover are housed in some sort of speaker enclosure. These enclosures serve a number of functions. On their most basic level, they make it much easier to set up the speakers. Everything's in one unit and the drivers are kept in the right position, so they work together to produce the best sound. Enclosures are usually built with heavy wood or another solid material that will effectively absorb the driver's vibration. If you simply placed a driver on a table, the table would vibrate so much it would drown out a lot of the speaker's sound. Additionally, the speaker enclosure affects how sound is produced. When we looked at speaker drivers, we focused on how the vibrating diaphragm emitted sound waves in front of the cone. But, since the diaphragm is moving back and forth, it's actually producing sound waves behind the cone as well. Different enclosure types have different ways of handling these "backward" waves.